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APPENDICES

Some Additional Resources

With the exception of the first appendix, this section is meant to serve as a supplementary resource for those who work in a college right-to-life group. Appendix One offers advice to the college pro-lifer who cannot join a right-to-life group and want to work solo. Also of special interest are the appendices on running an efficient meeting and on giving a speech.




Appendix One: The Underground Pro-Lifer

Most of this text was written with the college right-to-life group in mind. But what does a pro-lifer do if he or she cannot start or join a right-to-life group? How can the commuter, or the night-student who has a regular job, or the student bogged down with other commitments contribute to the pro-life cause? How can an "underground" pro-lifer - the lone operator - on a college campus spread the pro-life message?

First of all, let me say that there are advantages to working alone. The lone pro-lifer can more easily avoid negative stereotypes and unconstructive conflicts, for instance. But in ordinary situations I would recommend that any truly dedicated pro-lifer either start or join up with a right-to-life group.

Assuming that working with a group is not possible, what then can be done by our underground pro-lifer?

For starters, he or she could "infiltrate" various campus organizations which have money, and influence the way it is spent. Say, for example, that our underground pro-lifer joins the speakers committee or the campus program council and learns that some folks on the committee wish to bring a well-known speaker who is pro-abortion - like Gloria Steinem - to campus. He or she could suggest that the committee not bring in Gloria Steinem to talk on feminism, but rather bring in Gloria Steinem to debate Mildred Fay Jefferson on feminism and the Roe vs. Wade decision arguing that a debate would be more interesting and bring in a larger audience. Of course, our underground pro-lifer would also make sure that all the local pro-life groups and the media were well-informed of the impending debate.

Other groups to get involved with include:

Note: many of the students in these organizations will be among the brightest students at your school. That does not mean however that they will be intellectually honest. Often, otherwise intelligent students will embrace a liberal, or even radical, ideology because they feel that that is the way to be open-minded. They remain locked in their prejudices, however, because they forget that keen critical thinking is also a part of intellectual honesty. Rational arguments can be futile in such a situation; an underground pro-lifer may then be most effective by emphasizing that his or her concern is for the care and nurture of life and not its destruction.

There are many things that an underground pro-lifer can do while working independently. He or she could put up posters around campus, distribute pro-life literature in the dormitories, or keep a series of letters to the editor on abortion or infanticide going all term. The possibilities abound.

I would caution against vandalism, such as spray-painting pro-life messages on the walls of your school's administration building. An occasional harmless practical joke like wiring the loudspeakers in your sports stadium so you can broadcast pro-life messages during a home football game might seem funny, but such jokes really are often counter-productive. After all, the pro-life movement is dealing with very serious issues.

Finally, it should be noted that many of the ideas presented in the earlier parts of this handbook can be readily adapted for use by an underground pro-lifer. Just add a little imagination and you'll be off and running.




Appendix Two: Giving a Speech

Giving a good speech is an art. Some people appear to speak before others quite naturally, but, as in any art, even those without natural talents can become quite skillful if they have a grasp of the fundamentals. The fundamental parts of a speech are the Introduction, the Body, and the Conclusion. Here is what each of these parts must accomplish:

The Parts of a Speech: Introduction

First and foremost, the introduction of your speech must command the listeners' attention. Picture your audience as pathetically bored - they are looking at their watches and yawning. The very first sentence you utter must explode! It must break through the barrier of their own thoughts and concerns and take charge of their attention.

A pro-life speaker might begin his talk with a story of how a baby was born alive at, say, twenty weeks gestation and survived.

After you have caught your audience's attention the trick is to keep it. You must build a bridge to your listener's interests. You must show him why this subject is of interest to him. He will say, "Yes, you caught my attention with that opening line, but why are we talking about this, anyway?" Answer the question directly. You must tell him why this subject is of interest to him, now. You must demand his personal involvement. This, of course, requires that your entire speech be tailored to the audience at hand. An experienced speaker never gives exactly the same speech twice.

State your main idea next. Lay it on the table, sweetly and simply. It should be a single sentence which states exactly what you are going to explain, prove, demand, or describe in the remainder of your speech. Make it short.

Finally, your introduction should offer a preview of the major points of your speech. This serves as a road map for the listener, and should be kept to one or two sentences in length. It must tell the listener where you are at any given place in the speech, where you are taking him next, and how it fits into the plan laid out in your statement of the main idea. In longer speeches especially, it is helpful to review this road map once or twice, at the end of an important point, to refresh the listener's memory. Say, "As you remember, I said I would demonstrate this, this and this. Now, having done so, the next step is to...."

The Parts of a Speech: Body

After you have stated the main idea of your speech, your listener is interested in only one thing: "For instance!" Whether he is skeptical or sympathetic, you need to provide him with specifics to bring your point home. Amplify your case. The body of your speech provides the supporting evidence for this. Examples are the sine qua non of supporting evidence.

Here are seven forms for good examples:

  1. Listeners love a story. When you were a child the first thing you demanded was "Tell me a story..." All through our lives we love a good tale, and the person who can tell one is welcome everywhere. Lace the body of your speech with a few examples in story form.
  2. Provide an example which makes the pages of history come alive. If you can provide an illustration which utilizes an incident in recorded history, you will find that it carries much more persuasive power than an undocumented anecdote. Your audience wants to know "How did this happen? Where did this come from? Has it happened before? What did people do then?"
  3. Bring in an example which involves a famous person, a person well known to your audience. This can be as simple as a quote, or in the form of a longer anecdote.
  4. Vital statistics can be interesting if they are presented properly. The statistics cited must be easy to understand. They must be vital to your point - nothing bores faster than a lot of meaningless numbers. And they must be properly visualized. A statement such as "There are a million abortions a year" may be true, but it lacks the impact of the statement "One out of every three pregnancies ends in abortion."
  5. Paint a colorful analogy. An analogy draws comparisons between something that your listener already knows, understands, or believes, and something which he does not. Ask your audience, for instance, if they have ever been to a professional football game. Was the stadium full? Then ask them to imagine thirty times that number of children aborted. Thus, analogies are especially useful when trying to introduce a new concept.
  6. If you can begin an example with, "A recognized expert in such-and-such said this...," do so. People give weight to the opinions of experts, but you should ask yourself: Is this expert qualified to speak in this area? Does he know the facts? Does he have some bias which renders his opinion suspect? This is important because, aside from our own experiences, we gain most of our beliefs and opinions from the testimony of others.
  7. A picture really is worth a thousand words. Listeners like visual aids woven into the fabric of your speech. Chalkboards, charts, slides, show-and-tell objects; all these can help your audience see your point. Note: a clumsily handled slide projector is a distraction you can do without - make sure the projector is in good running order before you begin your speech. Also, where you don't know with certainty that the equipment will be working, it never hurts to plan for the contingency that you may have to do without it. If you are prohibited from showing certain slides or pictures tell your audience that. It will arouse their curiosity. You should also put handout materials near the exits of any room in which you speak.
Use a simple vocabulary. Don't fly over your audience's head with sesquipedalian words - save them for the day you write articles for The National Review.

Humor - if it is appropriate - can be used at any point in your speech. Folks will remember a good joke long after they have forgotten the rest of your words. So much the better, if you can weave a few jokes or puns into your speech. Keep your jokes inoffensive and tasteful.

The Parts of a Speech: Conclusion

The conclusion of your speech should do two things: First, it should summarize the main points, and second, it should give a call for action. It should tell them what you've said and what they should be doing about it.

Review the implications of the examples used in the body of your speech showing where they support the main idea of your speech. Leave the listener with an outline of your argument.

The call for action answers the audience's question "What now?" You must give them an answer entailing at least one course of action which they are able to take. Don't tell them of abstract, pie-in-the-sky catch-all solutions. Give them an idea of what they themselves can do in the upcoming days. Join! Vote! Write to the President! Call your Congressman! Tell your friends! Act now! Contribute! It's up to you!

Above all other things, remember that your audience wants two things of you. First, they want you to speak well. Second, they want you to sit down, so keep it short.

Delivery of the Speech

In speech-making, the delivery is every bit as important as the content of the speech. The story is told of a priest who once asked an well-known actor why an audience listened to him with such great interest when he spoke of things that were blatantly fictional, yet they barely listened to their pastors when spoken to of God. The actor replied "That is because we speak of the fictional as though it were true, while you speak of the True as though it were fiction." You must realize what you are speaking of, and get your audience to sense the intensity of that realization.

These are some guidelines for the effective delivery of your speech:

Look in your local library for books on speech-making such as Dale Carnegie's Public Speaking. For more information on how to write and give a speech, write to International Paper Company, College Survival Kit, Dept. NOC, P.O. Box 954, Madison Square Station, New York, NY 10010, and ask for their brief paper entitled "How to make a speech."




Appendix Three: How to Run An Efficient Meeting

Ordinarily, the responsibility for calling meetings rests on the shoulders of the president of your group. The president, or other leader, must take the responsibility to establish objectives for each meeting and see that they are accomplished. An efficient meeting makes this task easier for the leader and more pleasant for all concerned. All meetings should have a chairperson; he or she could be your group's president or somebody designated by the president.

The following are some guidelines for running an efficient meeting:

  1. Decide what you want to accomplish at the meeting, and write it down in an agenda.
  2. Examine alternatives to having a meeting. Could items on the agenda be better handled through some other medium, such as a newsletter? Some things might be more appropriately handled in a committee meeting, for instance.
  3. If the meeting is for your entire group, you will want as many people to show up as possible, so you have to take steps to see that they are properly informed. High attendance helps build morale, and makes it easier to get volunteers for your group's projects. A large meeting, however, must be well planned and must have someone definitely in charge. This ordinarily is your group's president.
  4. If the meeting is for officers or a committee, only those who are concerned with the business at hand should be involved. These meetings should be kept small so more can be accomplished. Here there should also be an officer or chairperson in charge of the meeting.
  5. Distribute the agenda in advance, say roughly a week or two before the meeting. This should not be the first time anyone has heard of the meeting. Establish some priorities, set the most important things for the first part of the meeting in case you do not have time to cover the entire agenda. This is also important because members' attentions tend to wane toward the end of a meeting.
  6. The agenda should contain brief descriptions of the topics in order of their importance. It should also tell who is responsible for each item, so that person can be prepared to speak at the proper time. Committee reports, or reports from people in charge of special projects should be among your agenda items. A rough estimate of time allotted for each item, including breaks, should also be included. This makes it possible to judge the progress of the meeting.
  7. Be brief. Time is important to every college student, so use it well. Start your meetings punctually - if the chairperson is late, something which should happen only in the rarest of occasions, another leader should begin to lead the meeting and relinquish control once the chairperson arrives. The chair should try to keep people on the topic at hand and try to control interruptions while still giving everyone their chance to talk. Keep to the time-table on the agenda.
  8. Summarize the vital points of what has been agreed upon. The chair should briefly state what is going to be done, when it is to be done, and who agreed to do it.
  9. Write down what happens. Someone should keep notes on who agreed to do what when. Minutes are important for an efficient meeting, but only if they are used. Copies of the minutes should be included in the next newsletter or mailing, and the chair should have the responsibility to see that each person is reminded of what they agreed to do. This is best accomplished through a phone call a couple of days after the meeting. Written reminders are also important.
  10. Always establish the time, date, and place of your next meeting before you adjourn.



Appendix Four: Sample Membership Information Form

STUDENTS FOR LIFE!
Membership Information Form
*****************
Please Print
*****************

Name ______________________________________ Date _________
Department ________________________________________________
Major _____________________________ Year of Graduation ________

Personal Address (School) ____________________ Telephone ____________
___________________________________________
_________________________________________ Zip Code ________
Personal Address (Home) ____________________ Telephone ____________
___________________________________________
_________________________________________ Zip Code ________
Personal Address (Summer) ____________________ Telephone ____________
___________________________________________
_________________________________________ Zip Code ________


Are you registered to vote? _______ In what State? ______________________
Congressional District? _______ State Sen. Dist.? _____ State Rep. Dist. _____
What is your birth date? ______________
How many years have you been active in the pro-life movement? ________________
What is the extent of your experience in the pro-life movement? ______________
________________________________________________________
Have you ever held an office in a pro-life group? _________________________
What other college organizations are you or have you been involved in? ________
________________________________________________________

Have you ever held an office in any of these groups? ______________________

What type of activities would you like to see our group become involved in?
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________


Do you have experience in....
Baking cookies? ____ Playing guitar or other musical instrument? ____
Writing news articles? ____ Running a Coffeehouse? ____ Taking photos? ____
Lobbying? ___ Picketing abortion clinics? ___ Counseling pregnant women? ____
Handing out leaflets? ____ Designing posters? ____ Hanging posters? ____
Writing a newsletter? ____ Organizing trips? ____ Debating? ____
Giving a speech? ____ Stuffing envelopes? ____ Writing Congressmen? ____


Please list the names and addresses of any other college students you may know
who might be interested in the pro-life movement:
________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________


_Please complete form and return soon to the group president. Thank You!_




Appendix Five: Sample Interest Survey

INTEREST SURVEY

Name____________________________________________________ Date__________
Address_________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________ Phone _____________________

Please check off all items that you are interested in. Write the word
YES! next to the four items that interest you the most.

EDUCATION

____ Write letters to the editor of our college newspaper.
____ Write articles for our college paper.
____ Place pro-life books in libraries.
____ Hand-out leaflets and distribute literature.
____ Organize a campus debate.
____ Bring pro-life speakers to campus.
____ Work with the student government.
____ Get student government to pass resolutions for the right to Life.
____ Go to pro-abortion talks and speak out for the right to Life.
____ Publish a campus pro-life newsletter.
____ Write articles for the newsletter.
____ Hold a pro-life film festival.
____ Other:


PUBLICITY

____ Put up posters across campus.
____ Place notices in the campus newspapers.
____ Write news-releases for the general press.
____ Get public service announcements on the radio and television.
____ Make pro-life float for parades.
____ Construct right to Life exhibit.
____ Other:


ACTION

____ Write letters to Congressmen and Senators.
____ Organize our group's trip to Washington for the National March.
____ Visit elected officials.
____ Organize a protest rally.
____ Organize group letter-writing sessions.
____ Conduct voter registration drive.
____ Distribute information about candidates' positions on abortion.
____ Picket abortion clinics.
____ Other:


SOCIAL SERVICE

____ Take classes in how to counsel pregnant women.
____ Work with the group at a soup kitchen.
____ Help tutor unwed mothers of high school age.
____ Collect baby clothes and supplies for needy mothers.
____ Take handicapped children ice-skating.
____ Visit the elderly in nursing homes.
____ Other:


FUND-RAISING

____ Help with a Bake Sale.
____ Help organize a walk for Life.
____ Solicit donations.
____ Sell raffle tickets.
____ Organize a Dance-A-Thon.
____ Think up new ways to raise funds.
____ Other:


GENERAL

____ Organize a phone calling network.
____ Send out notices of impending meetings and activities.
____ Help with typing newsletters.
____ Get posters designed and printed up.
____ Maintain group library.
____ Take photos of pro-life activities.
____ Play the guitar for group activities. (parties, coffeehouses, etc.)
____ Prepare for group parties.
____ Other:





Appendix Six: Sample Constitution

This constitution - which is the actual one used by Students for Life at the University of Pittsburgh - is meant to serve only as an example of how a group constitution might be written. The author does not necessarily contend that it is the best of all possible formats.

CONSTITUTION
of
Students for Life
at the
University of Pittsburgh


Preamble It has come to pass in our country that the long honored tradition of respect for life has been abrogated by our government, and the intent of the craftsmen of the Constitution has been denied. Thomas Jefferson speaks to us even now when we read his words that "the care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate objective of good government." Through its recognition and support of abortion, our society has cracked the stones of its foundation and has taken a step down the bleak road of injustice.

In the belief that all human life is sacred, we have come together to uphold its worth in the eyes of the university community.

We believe that human life begins at the moment of conception and continues until the moment of natural death. We believe that there is no such thing as a human life not worth living, and in a society where human life is rapidly becoming less valuable than material goods we shall defend the most defenseless of all human lives: the elderly, the handicapped, and the unborn. We shall resist any attempts to solve people's problems which involve the elimination of innocent people. We shall advocate and strive to enhance the dignity of all human life. We shall also strive to educate the university community about the value of human life and to teach it how to seek out and implement living solutions to the problems of our times.

We shall be a nondenominational group and, as such, shall embrace all persons who value the sacredness of human life. Our language and actions shall be consistent with the principles of nonviolence. We believe that the value of human life is an issue of universal public concern and not merely a matter of personal morality.

With these ideals in mind, we present this constitution as the framework for Students for Life and hope that through its efforts we may make those same ideals a reality.

Article I: The General Assembly
Section 1

Membership in Students for Life shall be open to all registered students, faculty, and staff of the University of Pittsburgh. Student membership shall at all times be at least three-quarters of the total membership. No hazing or illegal discrimination shall be used as a condition of membership in this organization.

Prospective members are welcomed throughout the year and can become active members at any time.

In order to become an active member and maintain this status, one needs to attend two consecutive meetings and become involved in at least one project. Minimum involvement in any project shall be determined by the Executive Board, with special attention given to the project chairman.

Inactive members are members who support the group in its beliefs but are unable to fulfill or maintain the requirements of active membership.

Section 2

Honorary membership in Students for Life shall be extended to all persons who do not qualify for active or inactive membership but nonetheless support the group's ideals and help out with its projects. Honorary members share all the privileges of regular members except that of voting and that of directly receiving university funds for travel expenses and other approved purposes.

The General Assembly of Students for Life shall consist of all active, inactive, and honorary members.

Article II: The Executive Board
Section 1

The Executive Board of Students for Life shall consist of the president, vice-president, and business manager of the group. All officers must be active members who are full-time students who have been elected by a majority of the membership present at the election. The term of office for all officers and committee chairmen shall be one year commencing on the first day of April and ending on the last day of March.

Officers and committee chairmen shall hold the same voting powers as all other voting members, except for the president, who shall only vote in the event of a tie. He can vote, however, in elections.

Section 2: The President

As the executive head of Students for Life, the president shall preside at all meetings of the Executive Board and the General Assembly. He shall appoint the chairmen of all standing and ad hoc committees. He is ultimately responsible for calling all meetings and notifying the General Assembly of them. The president also performs all other duties incident to his office as may from time to time be assigned to him by the Executive Board or the General Assembly.

Section 3: The Vice-President The vice-president shall assist the president and perform his duties in the event of the president's absence, resignation, or removal from office, or other circumstances that prevent him from doing his work. He shall also perform any other duties that the Executive Board or the General Assembly assigns him to do.

Section 4: The Business Manager The business manager shall, in conference with the president, be responsible for the everyday business of the group, in particular for the finances and business dealings with the university.

Section 5: Honorary Members of the Executive Board The presidents of Carnegie-Mellon University Association for Life, Duquesne University Students for Life!, and Carlow College Students for Life shall be honorary members of the Executive Board of Students for Life at the University of Pittsburgh. They shall share in all the privileges of honorary membership and, in addition, shall have the privilege of attending all meetings of the Executive Board and advising its regular members.

Article III: Committees
Section 1

There shall exist five standing committees: Publicity, General Education, Social Service, Political Education, and Business and Finance. Other ad hoc committees may be created as needed by the Executive Board. These committees can only become standing by amendment and shall be terminated at the end of each term of office or when the Executive Board elects to disband them.

Section 2: Publicity

This committee shall be concerned with publicizing all actions and programs that Students for Life shall sponsor, as well as publicizing the group and its objectives in general.

Section 3: General Education

This committee shall be responsible for educating the general membership and the campus community about the non-political aspects of current pro-life issues, particularly the biological and ethical aspects of these issues.

Section 4: Social Service

This committee shall be responsible for promoting and managing all volunteer projects aiding persons such as the poor, the elderly, and the handicapped, that Students for Life decides to sponsor.

Section 5: Political Education

This committee shall be responsible for educating the general membership and the campus community about the political and legal aspects of current pro-life issues. It will also manage all marches and demonstrations that Students for Life decides to sponsor or participate in.

Section 6: Business and Finance

This committee shall be responsible for all the financial obligations of each committee and of Students for Life as a whole. It shall handle the group's university account and all fund-raising projects. The business manager is always chairman of this committee.

Article IV: Meetings
The Executive Board shall call meetings as often as it determines that they are needed. There shall be a minimum of six meetings per academic year, one of which must be held in March for the purposes of electing officers.

All members shall be given at least one week's notice of each general meeting, along with special notice of any particular business to be conducted at that time that is known in advance.

Article V: Elections
Elections shall be held each year at the first meeting held during the month of March.

All active members who are in good academic standing are eligible to run for any office. Nominations shall be held during the meeting prior to the elections and during the meeting immediately prior to the election, if the membership present determines this to be necessary. Any member can nominate any other member, including himself. Nominees not willing to run for office can refuse the nomination.

Both active and inactive members can vote at the elections of officers. Votes shall be counted by a temporary elections officer who is not running for any office. This elections officer shall be appointed by the incumbent president, subject to the approval, by a simple majority, of all voting members present. Officers are likewise elected by a simple majority of all voting members present.

Any eligible member can run for as many officers as he wishes, although he cannot hold more than one position. If he wins the election for more than one office, he must immediately choose which position that he wants. The vacant office shall then be filled by the candidate with the next largest number of votes in each case.

There will be no absentee or proxy ballots accepted.

Article VI: Finances
Only the elected officers and faculty advisor can request funds from Students for Life's university account. Funds can only be used as budgeted for everyday business or special events.

Everyday business needs include such items as books, office supplies, educational materials, and other items needed for publicity.

Special events' needs include such things as honoraria for speakers, rental fees for audiovisual equipment, and travel expenses for conventions and marches.

All funding shall come through the Student Government Board and the Office of Student Activities of the university, special donations, and the group's own fund-raising projects.

Article VII: Vacancies and Impeachments
Section 1

In order to remove any officer, a proposal must be made and seconded at any general meeting. The officer in question must be notified of this proposal and given the opportunity to resign. If he chooses not to resign, a vote shall be taken by secret ballot at the next general meeting. A two-thirds majority shall be needed to remove any officer, who must then immediately vacate his position.

Section 2

If a vacancy in any office should arise for any reason, it shall be filled by means of a special election at the next general meeting for which appropriate notice can be given to the voting membership. Elections shall be held in the same manner as regular elections, but the term of the office in question shall only extend until the next general election.

Article VIII: Amendments and Parliamentary Authority
Section 1

Amendments to this constitution can be proposed by any active member at any general meeting. If the proposed amendment is seconded, a vote shall then be taken to determine if it is important enough to draw up and consider at the next general meeting. If this motion passes by a simple majority, the proposed amendment is then written up formally for the next meeting and listed on the agenda for that next meeting's business.

A two-thirds majority is needed for the amendment to pass. The Office of Student Activities must then be notified in writing of this change in the constitution.

Section 2

Robert's Rules of Order Revised by Henry M. Robert is to be used in cases not covered by this constitution.




Appendix Seven: Sample Press Release

For Immediate Release....
CARNEGIE-MELLON STUDENTS PRESENT "THE SILENT SCREAM"
On Tuesday, Nov. 19th, 1985 at 7:30 p.m., the Carnegie-Mellon University Association for Life will present the controversial film concerning abortion, "The Silent Scream." The film will be shown in Doherty Hall, Room 1112, on the Carnegie-Mellon campus at 5000 Forbes Avenue in Oakland.

Using real-time ultra-sound technology, this film details an actual abortion procedure. Dr. Bernard Nathanson, a founder of the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws and now a prominent pro-life physician, is the narrator of the film. The ultra-sound sequences of the abortion shown in the film have been attacked by members of the pro-choice/pro-abortion establishment who claim that the film has been "doctored." However, inter- nationally renowned ultra-sound experts have testified to the accuracy of the film and the integrity of Dr. Nathanson.

After the film, Dr. James Dattrillo will answer questions and discuss the medical aspects of abortion, including fetal pain and the possiblity of complications which may endanger the life of the mother.

The Carnegie-Mellon University Association for Life is a group of students concerned with a variety of human life issues, including the problems of abortion. Members of the group devote time helping young women who contact Lifeline, a pregnancy crisis center. Students also volunteer at the Jubilee Soup Kitchen in the Hill District.

Abortion has become a "hot" issue on the Carnegie-Mellon campus in recent months, as well as on other college campuses across the state.

Contact:

Felicia Thibeault, President,
Carnegie-Mellon University Association for Life,
Box 11, Baker Hall P.O.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213,
(412) 361-3714

Terece Turton, Public Relations Chairperson,
1060 Morewood Avenue, Box 1748,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213,
(412) 578-4819
# # #



Appendix Eight: Resource Publications

The following is a list of some books, booklets, and periodicals that a college right-to-life group should consider when building a resource library.

Books


Andrusko, David, editor, To Rescue The Future: The Pro-Life Movement in the 1980's. Toronto, Ontario: Life Cycle Books, 1984.


Clark, Colin, Population Growth. Santa Ana, California: R.L. Sassone, 1975.


Brennan, William, The Abortion Holocaust: Today's Final Solution. St. Louis, Missouri: Landmark Press, 1983.


DeMarco, Donald, Abortion In Perspective - The Rose Palace or The Fierry Dragon. Cincinnati, Ohio: Hayes Publishing Co., 1974.


Diamond, Eugene F., This Curette for Hire. Chicago, Illinois, 1977.


Dillon, Valerie Vance, Life In Our Hands. Baltimore, Maryland: Garamond/Pridemark Press, 1973.


Flanagan, Geraldine Lux, The First Nine Months Of Life. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1962.


Frech, Frances, The Great American Stork Market Crash. Liguori, Missouri: Liguori Publications, 1973.


Garton, Jean Staker, Who Broke The Baby? Toronto, Ontario: Life Cycle Books, 1979.


Hensley, Jeff Lane, editor, The Zero People. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Servant Books, 1983.litics Kit." Huntington Station, New York: Celebrate Life Committee of Long Island, P.O. Box 39, 1974


Doyle, Arlene, "Do You Need Permission To Save An Unborn Baby?" Commack, New York, By the Author, P.O. Box 405, 1977.


Hilgers, Thomas W., "Induced Abortion." Rochester, Minnesota: By the Author, Box 744, 1973.


Mokowske, Judy and Wirth, Robert G., "Preparing the Pro-Life Newsletter." Minneapolis, Minnesota: American Citizens Concerned for Life Education Fund, 1975


National Committee for A Human Life Amendment, Inc., "A Guide for Pro-Life Citizen Action." Washington, D.C.: National Committee for A Human Life Amendment, Inc., 1707 L St. N.W., Suite 400.


Saltenberger, Ann, "Every Woman Has A Right to Know the Dangers of Legal Abortions." Glassboro, New Jersey: Air-Plus, 1975.


Senander, Mary, "Electronic Media - Facilitator of Social Change." Golden Valley, Minnesota: Communications for Life, Inc., 1977.


Simmons, Sandra, "Funding Pro-Life Activities." Minneapolis, Minnesota: American Citizens Concerned for Life Education Fund.


Wolcott, John and Roberta, "Balancing The News" Marysville, Washington 98270: Features Northwest, 5132-126th Place N.E..

Periodicals


About Issues, American Life Lobby, P.O. Box 490, Stafford, Virginia 22554.


The National Right-To-Life News, 529 14th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20045.


Lex Vitae, Suite 915, 230 Michigan Ave., Chicago, IL 60601.


Life Letter, The Ad Hoc Committee in Defense of Life, Inc., P.O. Box 574, Murray Hill Station, New York, New York 10016.


LifeLines, Pennsylvania Pro-Life Federation, 713 Investment Bldg., 239 4th Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


Human Life Review, The Human Life Foundation, Inc., 150 East 35th Street, New York, New York 10016.


The National Pro-Life Journal, Pro-Life Publications, P.O. Box 172, Fairfax, Virginia 22030.


Respect Life Report, National Council of Catholic Bishops, 1312 Massachusetts Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20005.



Appendix Nine: Contact List

This is a resource list of addresses for a wide variety of pro-life organizations. It is not meant to be comprehensive, but rather it is meant to be reflective of the breadth of the right-to-life movement. (Editor's Note: These addresses are from 1985.)

THE AD HOC COMMITTEE IN DEFENSE OF LIFE, INC.,
Box 574, Murray Hill Station,
New York, NY 10016.

ALABAMA CITIZENS FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 184,
Montgomery, AL 36101,
(205) 265-0454.

ALABAMA LIFELINE,
2112 Avenue H,
Ensley, AL 35208.

ALASKA RIGHT TO LIFE,
Box 2517,
Anchorage, AK 99509,
(907) 349-2420.

ALLIANCE FOR LIFE,
203-379 Broadway,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, CANADA, R3C-OT9,
(204) 942-4772.

AMERICAN CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR LIFE,
6127 Excelsior Blvd.,
Minneapolis, MN 55416.
(612) 925-4395.

AMERICANS AGAINST ABORTION,
2808 South Sheridan,
Tulsa, OK 74129.

ALTERNATIVES TO ABORTION, INTERNATIONAL,
46 North Broadway,
Yonkers, NY 10701,
(914) 423-8580.

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF PRO-LIFE OBSTETRICIANS AND GYNECOLOGISTS,
266 Piney Ave.,
Lauderdale By The Sea, FL 33308,
(305) 772-1853

AMERICAN LIFE LEAGUE,
P.O. Box 1350,
Stafford, VA 22554-9989,
(703) 659-4171.

AMERICANS UNITED FOR LIFE,
230 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 915,
Chicago, IL 60601,
(312) 263-5386.

THE ANGELUS,
P.O. Box 1187,
Dickinson, TX 77539.

ARIZONA RIGHT TO LIFE - NORTHERN REGION,
P.O. Box 25217,
Phoenix, AZ 85002,
(602) 254-0862.

ARIZONA RIGHT TO LIFE - SOUTHERN REGION,
P.O. Box 12126,
Tucson, AZ 85732,
(602) 326-1542.

ASOCIACION PRO-VIDA,
Paseo de Zorrilla, 90, 7.0 D,
47006-Valladolid-6, SPAIN.

BIRTHRIGHT NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS,
686 N. Broad St.,
Woodbury, NJ 08096.
(609) 848-1819.

BROWARD COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.
1906 E. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33306.

CALIFORNIA PRO-LIFE COUNCIL INC.,
1929 1/2 Zonal Ave.,
Los Angeles, CA 90033,
(213) 227-5503.

CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY ASSOCIATION FOR LIFE,
Box 11, Baker Hall P.O.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

THE CATHOLIC STANDARD AND TIMES,
222 N. 17th St.,
Philadelphia, PA 19103.

CATHOLICS FOR LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 2652,
Providence, RI 02907,

CATHOLICS UNITED FOR LIFE,
Star Rt., Box 42,
New Hope, KY 40052,
(502) 325-3061,
(502) 325-3829;
CUL Youth Crusaders at the same address.

CATHOLICS UNITED FOR THE FAITH, INC.,
222 North Ave - Box S,
New Rochelle, NY 10801,
(914) 235-9408.

CHESTER COUNTY CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR HUMAN LIFE,
P.O. Box 2102,
West Chester, PA 19803.

CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE MUSTARD SEEDS,
c/o Chestnut Hill College,
Philadelphia, PA, 19188.

CHRISTIAN ACTION COUNCIL,
788 National Press Building,
529 14th St., N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20045.

CINCINNATI RIGHT TO LIFE
EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION, INC.
,
P.O. Box 24073,
Cincinnati, OH 45224.

CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR HUMAN LIFE,
P.O. Box 1986,
Altoona, PA 16603.

CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR HUMAN LIFE, CAMBRIA-SOMERSET CHAPTER,
P.O. Box 525,
Johnstown, PA 15907.

COALITION OF AMERICAN PRO-LIFE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS,
5450 N. Kimball,
Chicago, ILL,
(312) 583-6109.

COLLEGE MISERCORDIA PRO-LIFE COMMISSION,
Dallas, PA 18612.

COLORADO REPUBLICAN PRO-LIFE CAUCUS,
P.O. Box 20546,
Denver, CO 80220.

COLORADO RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITEE,
128 West 11th Ave.,
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 572-8857.

COMMITTEE FOR LIFE,
74 Argyle Place,
Rockville Center, NY 11570.

COMMUNICATIONS FOR LIFE,
19435 Granada Ave., N.,
Forest Lake, MN 55424.

CONCERNED CITIZENS FORUM,
c/o Peter Jones, President,
2027 Dexter Dr.,
Falls Church, VA 22043,

(703) 893-1857. CONNECTICUT RTL CORP.,
9 Francis St.,
Trumbull, CT 06611,
(203) 268-6879.

THE CONSERVATIVE CAUCUS, INC.,
National Headquarters,
450 Maple Ave. East,
Vienna, VA 22180,
(703) 893-1550

CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
27 Marcy St.,
Cranston, RI 02905,
(401) 785-0350.

COUNSELING FOR ABORTION RELATED EXPERIENCES,
c/o 709B Investment Bldg.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
(412) 531-9092.

THE COUPLE-TO-COUPLE LEAGUE,
Box 11084,
Cincinnati, OH 45211.

COVENANT HOUSE,
P.O. Box 731,
Times Square Station,
New York, NY 10109

THE DEBATE FOUNDATION,
2128 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33311.

DELAWARE RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 1222,
Wilmington, DE 19899,
(302) 655-6299.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RIGHT TO LIFE,
515 6th Street, S.E.,
Washington, DC 20003,
(202) 547-6721.

DUBOIS COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 75,
Huntingburg, IN 47542.

DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FOR LIFE!
Union Information Center,
Duquesne University,
Pittsburgh, PA 15282.

EAGLE FORUM,
Box 618,
Alton, IL 62002.

ESSEX COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 771,
Orange, NJ 07050.

THE EUROPEAN WORKING PRO-LIFE GROUP,
Via Perenzio 7,
Rome 00193, ITALY.

FAMILY LIFE LEAGUE,
P.O. Box 293,
River Forest, IL 60305.

FEMINISTS FOR LIFE OF AMERICA,
1918 Upton Ave. North,
Minneapolis, MN 55411.

FLORIDA RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE, INC.,
5203 Willow Link,
Sarasota, FL 33580,
(813) 371-0622.

FOUNDATION FOR LIFE,
2854 Sylvania Ave.,
Toledo, OH 43613,

FOR LIFE, INC.,
Drawer 1279,
Tyron, NC 28782,
(704) 859-5392.

GANNON UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FOR LIFE,
c/o Gannon University Campus Ministry,
Erie, PA, 16541,
(814) 871-7000.

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY RIGHT TO LIFE,
Box 2239, Hoya Station,
Washington, DC 20057.

GEORGIA RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 49211,
Alanta, GA 30359,
(404) 378-2224.

GROVE CITY COLLEGE LIFE ADVOCATES,
Grove City College, Box 1042,
Grove City, PA 16127,
(412) 458-9900.

HAWAII RIGHT TO LIFE,
733 Bishop St.,
2757 Grosvenor Center,
Honolulu, HI 96813
(808) 537-5311

HERITAGE HOUSE '76, INC.,
P.O. Box 730,
Taylor, AZ 85939.

HOPE IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA,
109 Park Avenue,
Falls Church, VA 23324.

HOWARD COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 224,
Simpsonville, MD 21150
(301) 730-8422

THE HUMAN,
1295 Gerard St. E.,
Toronto, Ontario,
Canada, M4Y 1Y8.

HUMAN LIFE,
1316 East Pike,
Seattle, WA 98122,
(206) 322-1525.

THE HUMAN LIFE CENTER,
St. John's University,
Collegeville, MN 56321,
(612)363-3313 or 363-3552.

HUMAN LIFE INTERNATIONAL,
418 C Street, N.E.,
Washington, D.C. 20002,
(202) 546-2257.

THE HUMAN LIFE FOUNDATION,
150 E. 35th St.,
New York, NY 10016.

THE HUMAN LIFE REVIEW,
150 E. 35th St.,
New York, NY 10016.

HUNTSVILLE RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 13,
Huntsville, TX 77340.

IDAHO RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 1705,
Boise, ID 83701,
(208) 343-0554.

THE ILLINOIS FEDERATION FOR LIFE, INC.
412 Langdon Ave.,
Alton, IL 62002.
(312) 336-6259,
P.O. Box 1701,
Springfield, IL 62705,
(618) 465-7655.

ILLINOIS RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
35 West Jackson Blvd., Room 1264,
Chicago, IL 60604.

THE INDEPENDENT METHODIST,
P.O. Box 4274,
Jackson, MS 39216,
(601) 362-1301.

INDIANA FEDERATION FOR RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 2931,
Indianapolis, IN 46206,
(812) 663-5686.

INDIANA RIGHT TO LIFE,
333 N. Pennsylvania, \#521,
Indianapolis, IN 46204,
(317) 632-5433.

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA NEWMAN PRO-LIFE COMMITTEE,
c/o Indiana University of Pennsylvania Newman Center,
1200 Oakland Ave.,
Indiana, PA 15701.

INTERCOLLEGIATE FEDERATION FOR LIFE OF PENNSYLVANIA,
c/o Pitt Students for Life,
Fifth Floor, William Pitt Union, University of Pittsburgh,
Pittsburgh, PA 15260.

INTERSTATE COMMITTEE OF CLERGY AND LAITY,
P.O. Box 297,
Colonia, NJ 07067.

IOWANS FOR L.I.F.E.,
1818 Beaver,
P.O. Box 2006,
Des Moines, IA 50310,
(515) 255-4113.

KANSANS FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 25361,
Corporate Woods,
Overland Park, KS 66225.
(913) 764-1200.

KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE ASSOCIATION,
132 Chenoweth Lane,
Louisville, KY 40207,
(502) 895-5959.

LAPAC, INC.,
Ben Franklin Station,
P.O. Box 14263,
Washington, DC 20044,
(202) 638-3061.

LAPAC FUND,
P.O. Box 490,
Stafford, VA 22554,
(703) 659-6556.

LAWYERS FOR LIFE, INC.,
Suite 1800, Traders National Bank Bldg.,
1152 Grand Ave.,
Kansas City, MO 64106,
221-6420, or
10011 Belefontaine Rd.,
St. Louis, MO 63137,
(314) 868-7460.

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FOR LIFE,
c/o Lehigh University,
Bethlehem, PA, 18015.

LEX VITAE,
230 N. Michigan Ave. \#915,
Chicago, IL 60601.

LIFE - IRELAND,
91 Lower Baggort Street,
Dublin 2, IRELAND,
01-767676.

LIFE - NORTHERN IRELAND,
Room 210, Bryson House,
28 Beford Street,
Belfast, NORTHERN IRELAND, BT2 7FE,
(0232) 249414.

LIFE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH NETWORK,
8 Herbert Pk.,
Dublin 4, IRELAND.

LIFE CYCLE BOOKS,
12 Richmond Street East,
Suite 633,
Toronto, Ontario, CANADA, M5C1N2.

LIFE NEWSLETTER,
Box 19429,
El Cajon, CA 92119.

LIFELINE OF SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA,
Dept. L., 713 Investment Bldg.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15222.
Business Phone: (412) 562-0700.

LIFELINES,
217 Maple Ave.,
Clarks Summit, PA 18411.

LIFE-PAC,
1735 DeSales St., N.W., Suite 500,
Washington, DC 20036,
(202) 783-6947.

LOUISIANA RIGHT TO LIFE FEDERATION,
2929 S. Carrollton Ave.,
New Orleans, LA 70118,
(504) 821-5390.

LUTHERANS FOR LIFE,
675 North Syndicate,
St. Paul, MN 55104.

MAGDALEN COLLEGE,
Campus Ministry,
270 D.W. Highway South, Bedford, NH 03102,
(603) 669-7735.

MAINE RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
162 Lisbon St.,
Lewiston, ME 04240,
(207) 782-7379,
(207) 782-1158.

MANHATTAN RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
19 West 34th St., Room 615,
New York, NY 10001,
947-2692.

MARCH FOR LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 2950,
Washington, D.C. 20013,
(202) LIFE-377.

MARYLAND RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.
P.O. Box 115,
Kensington, MD 20795,
(301) 933-1933.

MASSACHUSETTS CITIZENS FOR LIFE,
313 Washington St.,
Newton, MA 02158,
(617) 964-7220.

MICHIGAN ALLIANCE FOR FAMILIES,
P.O. Box 241,
Flushing, MI 48433.

MINNESOTA CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR LIFE,
4803 Nicollet Ave.,
Minneapolis, MN 55409,
(612) 825-6831, and
3564 Sixth Place, N.W.,
Rochester, MN 55901.

MISSISSIPPI RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 5065,
Greenville, MS 38701,
(601) 332-6176.

MISSION POSSIBLE FUND,
4803 Nicollet Ave.,
Minneapolis, MN 55409.

MISSOURI DOCTORS FOR LIFE,
514 Tenby Terrace,
Manchester, MO 63011.

MISSOURI CITIZENS FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 651,
Jefferson City, MO 65102.
(314) 635-5110.

MOM'S HOUSE,
182 Gilbert St.,
Johnstown, PA 15906.

MONTANA RIGHT TO LIFE ASSOCIATION,
P.O. Box 7151,
Missoula, MT 59807,
(406) 251-3462.

MOUNT SAINT MARY'S COLLEGE,
Seminarians for Life,
Emmitsburg, MD 21727.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PRO-LIFE NURSES,
P.O. Box 28174,
Kansas City, MO 64118.

NATIONAL COALITION INTERSTATE COMMITTEE OF CLERGY AND LAITY,
P.O. Box 41,
Belmar, NJ 07719,
(201) 681-6460.

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR A HUMAN LIFE AMENDMENT,
1430 K. St., N.W., Suite 800,
Washington, D.C. 20005,
(202) 785-8061.

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR ADOPTION,
1346 Connecticut Ave. NW,
Washington, DC 20036.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CATHOLIC BISHOPS,
BISHOP'S COMMITTEE FOR PRO-LIFE ACTIVITIES
,
1312 Massachusetts Ave, N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20005.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CATHOLIC CHARITIES,
1346 Connecticut Ave., N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20036.

NATIONAL DEMOCRATS FOR LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 2334,
Huntington, WV 25724.

NATIONAL PREGNANCY HOTLINE,
(800) 344-7211.

NATIONAL PRO-LIFE DEMOCRATS, INC.
1500 Massachusetts Ave, N.W., \#432,
Washington, D.C. 20005.
(202) 463-0940.

NATIONAL PRO-LIFE ORATORICAL COMMITTEE,
7 Portland Place,
Staten Island, NY 10301,
(212) 447-4197.

NATIONAL RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
Suite 402, 419 7th St. N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20004,
(202) 626-8800.

NATIONAL RIGHT TO LIFE NEWS,
Suite 402, 419 7th St. N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20004,
(202) 626-8800.

NATIONAL RIGHT TO LIFE POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE,
Suite 402, 419 7th St. N.W.,
Washington, D.C. 20004,
(202) 626-8800.

NATIONAL YOUTH PRO-LIFE COALITION,
P.O. Box 67,
Newport, KY 41071,
(606) 491-4499.

NEBRASKA COALITION FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 94,
Gretna, NE 68028,
(402) 332-4553, or
5017 Leavenworth St.,
P.O. Box 6501, Elmwood Station,
Omaha, NB 68106,
(402) 556-6003.

SOUTHERN NEVADA RTL COMMITTEE,
1648 Ottawa Dr.,
Las Vegas, NV 89109,
(702) 735-1746.

NEW HAMPSHIRE RIGHT TO LIFE,
120 Main St., Suite 5,
Nashua, NH 03060,
(603) 889-3412

NEW JERSEY RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE,
P.O. Box 297,
Raritan, NJ 08869,
(201) 658-4275.

NEW JERSEY YOUTH PRO-LIFE COALITION,
21 Longbow Dr.,
Manalapan. NJ 07726.

NEW MEXICO RIGHT TO LIFE,
St. Joseph's Hospital,
Albuquerque, NM 87102,
(505) 848-8000

NEW ORLEANS RIGHT TO LIFE,
344 Lakeshore Dr.,
New Orleans, LA 70124.

NEW YORK STATE RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE, INC.
41 State St.,
Albany, NY 12207,
(518) 434-1293,
Media Office:
19 West 34th St., Rm. 807,
New York, NY 10001,
(212) 947-2692.

NORTH CAROLINA CATHOLICS UNITED FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 51151,
Raleigh, NC 27609.

NORTH CAROLINA RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 9363,
Greensboro, NC 27408,
(919) 288-6208.

NORTH DAKOTA RIGHT TO LIFE,
1923 Catherine Dr.,
Bismark, ND 58501,
(701) 258-3811.

NORTHERN DAKOTA RIGHT TO LIFE ASSOC.,
P.O. Box 551,
Bismarck, ND 58501,
258-3811

NORTHERN KENTUCKY RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 1202,
Covington, KY 41012.

NURSES CONCERNED FOR LIFE OF FORT WAYNE,
910 Broadway,
Fort Wayne, IN 46802.

OHIO RIGHT TO LIFE,
21 W. Kossuth St.,
Columbus, OH 43206,
(614) 445-8369.

OKLAHOMANS FOR LIFE, INC.
3150 East 41st St., \#104,
Tulsa, OK 74105,
(918) 749-5022.

PARENT'S ALLIANCE TO PROTECT OUR CHILDREN,
44 E. Tacoma Ave.,
Latrobe, PA 15650,
(412) 459-6347.

PEARSON FOUNDATION, INC.,
\#290 O'Donnell Bldg.,
3663 Lindell Blvd.,
St. Louis, MO 63108,
or Clerical Office,
P.O. Box 3016,
Tulsa, OK 74101.

PENN STATE STUDENTS FOR LIFE
Pennsylvania State University,
c/o Hetzel Union Building Desk,
University Park, PA 16802.

PENNSYLVANIA PRO-LIFE FEDERATION,
713 Investment Bldg.,
238 4th Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15222,
(412) 391-6862.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - ADAMS CO. CHAPTER,
R.D. \#1, Box 561,
Biglerville, PA 17307.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - MIDEAST REGION,
P.O. Box 3313,
Bethlehem, PA 18017.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - MIDWEST REGION,
P.O. Box 1102,
Greensburg, PA 15601.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - NORTHEAST REGION,
P.O. Box 10,
Scranton, PA 18504.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - SOUTHEASTERN REGIONAL CHAPTER,
118 Bala Ave.,
Bala Cynwad, PA 19003,
667-1191.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - SOUTHWEST REGION,
713 Investment Bldg.,
239 4th Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15222,
(412)391-6862.

PENNSYLVANIANS FOR HUMAN LIFE - SOUTH CENTRAL REGION,
411 Wolber Rd.,
Myerstown, PA 17047

PEOPLE CONCERNED FOR THE UNBORN CHILD,
3050 Pioneer Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA 15226,
(412) 391-6862.

PEOPLE FOR LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 1126,
Erie, PA 16512.

PHARMACISTS FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 03023,
Cleveland, OH 44103.

THE POPE JOHN XXIII MEDICAL-MORAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER,
4455 Woodson Rd.,
St. Louis, MO 63134,
(314) 428-2424.

PRESBYTERIANS PRO-LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 953,
Decatur, GA 30031.

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S NETWORK,
Human Life Advocates,
P.O. Box 13402,
Pittsburgh, PA 15243.

PRO-LIFE COALITION OF NORTHCENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA,
411 Church St.,
St. Mary's, PA 15857.

PRO-LIFE COALITION OF SOUTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA,
7707 Ridge Avenue,
Philadelphia, PA 19128.

PRO-LIFE COUNCIL OF CONNECTICUT,
80 Taylor Ave.,
East Haven, CT 06512, or
c/o Patricia C. Kanoff,
330 Foxwood Rd.,
Guilford, CT 06437.

PRO-LIFE NON-VIOLENT ACTION PROJECT,
P.O. Box 2193,
Gaithersburg, MD 20879,
(301) 774-4043

PRO-LIFE PUBLICATIONS,
P.O. Box 172,
Fairfax, VA 22030.

PRO-LIFERS FOR SURVIVAL,
National Office,
Damascus, MD 20872,
(301) 253-5606.

PROTECT THE UNBORN,
P.O. Box 7,
Claverack, NY 12513.

RIGHT TO LIFE,
2550 Via Tejon,
Palos Verdes Estates, CA 90274.

RIGHT TO LIFE LEAGUE OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA,
310 South Kingsley Dr.,
Los Angeles, CA 90020.

RIGHT TO LIFE - LIFESPAN, INC.,
Washtenaw County,
P.O. Box 1853,
Ann Arbor, MI 48106.

RIGHT TO LIFE OF GREATER CINCINNATI, INC.,
8228 Winton Rd.,
Cincinnati, OH 45321.

RIGHT TO LIFE OF KANSAS,
318 East Orme,
Wichita, KS 67211,
(316) 265-4773,
Crosby Place Mall,
717 S. Kansas Ave.,
Topeka, KS 66603,
(913) 233-8601,

RIGHT TO LIFE OF MICHIGAN,
920 Cherry St., S.E.,
Grand Rapids, MI 49506,
(616) 451-0601.

RIGHT TO LIFE OF UTAH,
438 N. Main St.,
Centerville, UT 84914,
(801) 292-3323.

RIGHT TO LIFE OREGON,
812 Willamette Bldg.,
534 SW 3rd Ave.,
Portland Ave.,
Portland, OR 92704,
(503) 222-3186.

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC,
P.O. Box 217,
Oyster Bay, NY 11771.

SAINT VINCENT'S COLLEGE RESPECT LIFE CLUB,
c/o Fr Joel Lieb,
St. Vincent's College,
Latrobe, PA, 15650,

(412) 539-9761, ext. 352. SALVATION ARMY NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS,
120 West 14th St.,
New York, NY 10011.

SAVE A BABY,
Hotline: 1-800-368-3336.

SCHENECTADY COUNTY RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE, INC.
P.O. Box 9231,
Schenectady, NY, 12309.

SCIENTISTS FOR LIFE, INC.,
1908 Washington Ave.,
Fredricksburg, VA 22401.

SEASHELL PRESS,
P.O. Box 12649,
El Cajon, CA 92022.

SETON HILL COLLEGE RESPECT FOR LIFE CLUB
Box 428-A, Seton Hill College,
Greensburg, PA 15601
(412) 834-2200, ext. 536.

THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF UNBORN CHILDREN - ENGLAND,
7 Tufton St.,
Westminster, London,
ENGLAND, SW1P 3QN,
01-222-5845.

THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION OF UNBORN CHILDREN - IRELAND,
4 Lower Abbey St.,
Dublin 1, IRELAND,
01-747340.

SPINA BIFIDA ADOPTION GROUP,
Mrs. Judie Grafstrom,
1955 Florida Dr.,
Xenia, OH 45285,
(513) 372-2040.

SPOTSWOOD RIGHT TO LIFE,
Spotswood, NJ 08884.

SOUTH CAROLINA CITIZENS FOR LIFE,
P.O. Box 6201,
Spartanburg, SC 29304,
(803) 884-1784,
(803) 723-5547.

SOUTH DAKOTA RIGHT TO LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 344,
801 E. Dakota Ave.,
Pierre, SD 57501,
(605) 224-9181.

TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS FOR LIFE,
Kingston pike,
P.O. Box 11395,
Knoxville, TN 37919,
(615) 584-0310.

TEXAS RIGHT TO LIFE OF HOUSTON, INC.,
P.O. Box 66174,
Houston, TX 77006, or
P.O. Box 66159,
Houston, TX 77266,
(713) 521-9993.

TEXAS RIGHT TO LIFE COMMITTEE, INC.,
P.O. Box 806,
Austin, TX 78767,
(512) 474-7473.

UNION COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, RIGHT TO LIFE,
P.O. Box 24,
Fanwood, NJ 07023.

UNITED STATES COALITION FOR LIFE, CAPITOL HILL LEGISLATIVE SERVICES,
P.O. Box 315,
Export, PA 15632,
(412) 327-7379.

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH STUDENTS FOR LIFE,
University of Pittsburgh,
5th Floor, Office 7C, William Pitt Union,
Pittsburgh, PA, 15260,
(412) 624-3968.

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON STUDENTS FOR LIFE,
c/o University of Scranton,
Scranton, PA, 18510.

VERMONTERS FOR LIFE,
19 Crescent St.,
Rutland, VT 05701,
(802) 773-3417.

VILLANOVANS FOR LIFE,
Villanova University,
c/o Student Activities, 208 Dagherty Hall,
Villanova University,
Villanova, PA, 19085,
(215) 645-7244.

VIRGINIA SOCIETY FOR HUMAN LIFE, INC.,
P.O. Box 582,
Richmond, VA 23205.

VIRGINIA SOCIETY FOR HUMAN LIFE,
Tidewater Chapter,
P.O. Box 8213,
Norfolk, VA 23503.

WASHINGTON STATE MARCH FOR LIFE,
Box 64275,
Tacoma, WA 98464.

WEST VIRGINIANS FOR LIFE, INC.
913 Hawthorne Ave.,
Morgantown, WV 26505,
(305) 598-3040,
(304) 599-0768, or
(304) 293-3402?

WISCONSIN CITIZENS CONCERNED FOR LIFE,
4840 W. Fond du Lac Ave.,
Milwaukee, WI 53216,
(414) 447-8333.

WOMANKIND,
4447 Mayfield Road,
Cleveland, OH 44121.

WOMEN EXPLOITED BY ABORTION,
P.O. Box 123,
Muskegon, MI 49443,
(616) 679-4069.

WOODBRIDGE RIGHT TO LIFE,
92 McKinley Ave.,
Colonia, NJ 07067.

WYOMING RIGHT TO LIFE,
243 South Center,
Box 1208,
Caspar, WY 82602,
(307) 237-7132.

YOUNG AMERICA'S FOUNDATION,
Suite 812, 11800 Sunrise Valley Dr.,
Reston, VA 22091,
(703) 620-5270.

YOUTH L.I.F.E. INTERNATIONAL,
c/o P.O. Box 1327,
Dublin 1, IRELAND,
Tel. +1-747642.